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Baguette boxes and butter

The pace slowed way down, and we all adjusted accordingly. The sunsets were absolutely amazing, as were the sunrises. I made sure I got up every day to enjoy these special gifts. Usually this meant getting up at 4 a.m.  

Image of a Huahine sunset

Huahine sunset

Image of a Huahine sunset from the deck

Huahine sunset from the deck

The first couple days of the trip, we all got sucked into drinking heavily. I ended up being the lightweight and only lasted three days of drinking before stopping, Bonita lasted seven days, Marla took a break, and the boys… well they are still going at it (Day 11 is when I wrote this post).

Image of Bonita and Marla standing together posing for a picture

Bonita and Marla enjoying don Julio’s 1942

The beach house had kayaks, and we all brought snorkeling gear. Everyone was just soaking up the sun. We wandered in to town to catch fresh fruit from the market; we never figured out how the hours operated in town. It seemed like everyone was up early (most of the men left on fishing boats for the days, and everyone was up to see them off). The rest of the time was baguette time. This meant that people timed their walk to town when fresh bread would be ready at the store. 
 
Image a shopper at a store selected a baguette from a shelf of breads

Selecting the right baguette is a very important thing; villagers spend time with this process.

The residents here have bread boxes on their porches to have baguette delivered twice a day. This is funny considering that the mail is not delivered to the doorsteps; they go to the post office to get that.

Image of a mailbox-like structure with a baguette inside

Baguette box

Image of a women in a market with a basket full of baguettes

Baguette time

We quickly adapted and timed our walk to town accordingly. The walk was a dirt path that ran along the water, maybe two blocks long.

Image of everyone walking along a beach trail

The gang walking to town along the beach trail.

There are a lot of open-type markets and food trucks. The tropical fruit is amazing; pineapples, papaya, mangoes, vanilla, lychee, coconuts, watermelons, cantaloupes, grapes, and bananas.

Image of a local outside market with several tables piled high with fresh fruit

Fresh fruit every morning

Image of a local outside market with a table with fresh eggs

Fresh eggs

Image of the back of a local truck filled with pineapples for sale

Pineapples

Image of an outdoor market with tables of fresh bananas and avocadoes

Bananas and avocados

All the animals run freely here, which means that dogs are everywhere (and usually pregnant or nursing), cats are king, and the roosters/hens are always on the side of the roads. We all saw cows enjoying the sunshine. The dogs all look like they are the same one or two breeds. The people are very friendly and are always smiling and waving. The neighbors are always giggling like school children. It is a very pleasant place.

Image of locals walking down the streets of an uncrowded Huahine

The town of Huahine

Image of a woman riding a bicycle down the street

Most folks use pedal bikes

We learned early on that the boys could not be trusted with butter. Like in France, the dairy is amazing and so are the dairy products. Whenever we go out to eat, along with the baguette, we get these big chunks of the creamiest butter…. it disappears quickly.

Much to do on Huahine
A toast to dinner, even if we don’t know what we just ordered
About Maya

My name is Maya, and I wander.

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