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They drive like amerikanas

The cover of Bridget Jone's: The edge of reason

http://www.bridgetjonesmovie.com

We drove the countryside from Rouen to a small town near Alencon, France. The driving has been not too bad, but there are many roundabouts. We have named the GPS Bridget on account of her British accent. Nikole has adopted a British accent and has become a little irritating. She now states everything with the accent. But, she is driving so Linzy and I just ignore her because neither of us want to drive.

Nikole has been a pretty good driver overall. She has only surprised the French a couple of times; one time included turning too wide and ending up on the railroad tracks. We rented a BMW that does EVERYTHING, which can sometimes compound the driving. It is a standard car and it seems to believe that it can do a better driving then Nikole. Occasionally, it believes she is not at a high enough RPM for the gear she is in, so it gives itself gas, which can be a little frightening.

A black BMW

The BMW – navigated by Bridget, driven by Nikole

And like in Alaska, Bridget is from the trickster corbeau clan (French for raven), and insists, in her accent, that the road does exist. You see, the problem here is that the roads are really winding and narrow with lots of cobble stone. Additionally, the roads often seem to be an equivalent width to the bike paths in Anchorage. The straight roads cost a toll to drive on. To drive from Paris to Bordeaux in tolls was about 50 euros, and with the dollar as weak as it is, it was spendy. We decided to take the roads without tolls, which would add nearly three hours to the drive. Since we were not in a hurry, we enjoyed the countryside from several angles. Eventually though, we needed to stop for the night and Bridget, from the raven trickster clan, led us to what she claimed was a hotel. It was really a barn and a closed down restaurant, and it was in the middle of nowhere on a country road. We had visions of the movie, An American Werewolf in London and several different zombie flicks. We ended up staying at a small French truck-stop, where no English was spoken, but the universal hand gestures for a cold beer were clearly understood.

We spent the next day driving some more before we made it to Bordeaux, a large city surrounded by large vineyards, and some of the greatest wine producers in the world.

We made a slight detour in Cognac to sample cognac; a very beautiful place. Many of the villages have a medieval center, where all the buildings are very old, and then spread out to new architecture. Cognac was no different.

The Hennessy factory

Cognac anyone?

Old buildings that look like castles with windy roads

Many old buildings and road hazards that go with them

Let the wine tasting begin!

Saturday is the start of the Marathon du Medoc. I invite you to check out the website. Here is an English version.

An excerpt about what we signed up to do:

Few marathons are in a class of their own. Le Marathon des Chateaux du Medoc on September 10, 2011 is one. Routed through 59 vineyards in the fabled villages of the Medoc region, this event appeals to the true connoisseur of fine runs. Where else do they ask you at the aid stations, “red or white Madame?”

Linzy and Nikole walking down a street in Bourdeaux at the start of the marathon

We walked by the start of tomorrow’s marathon

Another marathon bites the dust!
Something unidentifiable on the plate…..
About Maya

My name is Maya, and I wander.

Comments

  1. Good luck tomorrow – your marathon (I checked the site) is really in a world of its own. I love the recovery run idea, where you mosey through with wine, etc.!

    Are you 3 carbo-loading tonight? Isn't that unavoidable in France? LOL

  2. carbo loaded beyond belief Liz.. a little sick… lol

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